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HUM 101 First Year Experience  

Collection of articles and resources for the HUM 101 Research Project Assignment on "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks."
Last Updated: Jul 18, 2013 URL: http://infoguides.eou.edu/content.php?pid=480448 Print Guide RSS Updates

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Welcome

This library page contains resources for your research project assignment.

Students will research a topic/research question and make an argument related to themes in The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.  The themes/topics from the book can be seen in the blue tabs across the top (Healthcare, Medical Ethics, etc.).

Read all of the articles for your topic, and choose three of them (you may choose to find additional resources if you wish, such as video, interviews, websites, etc).  Working together, teams will write a 2 page (800 words minimum) paper on the topic.  During 10th week and finals week of class, teams will present their topic and defend their argument to the class. 

See the course syllabus for research paper requirements.

 

 

Acknowledgements

Many of the resources listed on this page were gathered by the Portland Community College Library to support their Common Reading Program.

 

Common Reading Program

EOU’s 2013 Common Reading Selection is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, and will be required reading as part of first-year student’s Humanities 101 course in fall 2013.

The goals of the Common Reading Program are:

  • To expose students to reading
  • To promote critical thinking
  • To connect first-year students to each other and to EOU through a shared intellectual experience
  • To integrate themes from the book into FYE courses

 

 

The Writing Process

Paper Writing Help

Short video tutorials from the CLIP project.

Cite Sources and Avoid Plagiarism

What is plagiarism?

Plagiarism is using other people's ideas without giving them proper credit for it. When you do this, you are implying that the ideas are your own. Doing this violates ethical standards. It can also endanger your grade. Use these resources to cite sources and avoid plagiarism:

 

Research Help

Get help from Pierce Library

More help at EOU

 

Accessing Library Resources

Some of the articles linked here are made available through databases to which the library subscribes. You may need to enter your student ID number and library password for authentication (to verify you are an EOU student, faculty or staff member).

Your library password, if you have never changed it, will be your last name, all lower case.

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